Showtime!

In “The Upside” a quadriplegic billionaire gets an unlikely caregiver, while in “A Dog’s Way Home” the lost are found.   In ”Destroyer”, an undercover cop comes to terms with an old nemesis, while In “Rust Creek”, a new age damsel is in distress.  Teen drama Five Feet Apart reaches for the hankies while Tyler Perry’s Madea family Funeral aims for broad laughs.  “The Woman in White” (BBC) remakes Wilkie Collin’s groundbreaking Gothic mystery, “Agatha Raisin” (BBC) offers a new age Ms Marple, while  “Better Call Saul” continues the misadventures of Breaking Bad’s gangster lawyer.

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New man in town

neverIn The Never Game, thriller writer Jeffrey Deaver introduces a new series character, Colter Shaw. The son of a survivalist family, Shaw is an expert tracker.  He makes a living as a “reward seeker,” traveling the country to help police solve crimes and private citizens locate missing persons. “When a young woman has gone missing in Silicon Valley, her father hires Shaw to find her.  What promises to be a simple investigation goes down unexpected byways. First, another person disappearances occur. Next, clues in both cases connect to a mysterious video game with a survival theme.

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The fixer and the spy

OurmanRichard made a career of putting out fires in hotspots around the world. His greatest achievement, the Dayton Accords, ended the Balkan wars of the 1990s; he died trying to negotiate an end to the fighting in Afghanistan. In Our Man”  George Packer recounts his life.  Dry material, you might think, but Packer (“The Unwinding”) is an excellent writer with an eye for the big picture. Here, he has crafted an epic that, says the NYT, will have you gripped by the third page. “If you could read one book to comprehend American’s foreign policy and its quixotic forays over the past 50 years, this would be it” (Walter Isaacson). If you wanted a second, The Good Spy, a life of CIA operative Robert Ames hints at what might have been an alternative history of this Middle East.

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Cool catalog feature

icon_overdrive    You can use our catalog to search for downloadable books and borrow them from NH Downloadable Books/Overdrive. When you look up a book, check the tab above the search result. One says “catalog”, which is the copies here in the library.  Clicking on the other tab, “Overdrive”, will show you copies available to download.  If you want to download a copy or get on a waiting list, click on the “Go To eBook or “Go To Audiobook” link.  This will vault you straight into the overdrive system, where you can get your stuff. How cool is that?

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Hoopla users update

hoopla2  The good news about Hoopla is that people are trying and enjoying this new service. The not-so-good news is that a few of our users are enjoying it perhaps a little too much. For that reason, we have changed our use-per month limit from eight to four items. If you have been using Hoopla to watch TV series shows, by all means continue to enjoy them, but try to think of them as weekly episodes.  We hope that this way we can make this service available to as wide a number of users as possible.

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Pilgrims

mountAINIn “The Second Mountain”, David Brooks talks about his quest for meaning outside the public sphere.  “This Life” by Martin Hägglund seeks meaning in the present moment.  In Brook’s scheme, the first mountain are the goals of getting ahead; the second mountain is the search for a deeper meaning (for those familiar with Brook’s columns, the landscape of the second mountain might appear strikingly familiar).   Meanwhile, Hagglund proposes a faith grounded in time, rather than striving for eternity, and to cherish this life as an end in itself.

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Oh, Pioneers

StoneyThe Pioneers” by David McCullough retells how settlers who brought the American ideal west over the Appalachians. It’s comfort reading for history buffs. “Stony the Road” by Louis Henry Gates, recounts the slow retreat from the new frontier paved by emancipation

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